What Ants Know

Sep 29, 2010 by

What Ants Know

For every single human being on the planet, there are at least 1.5 million ants.

That basically means that the total mass of all the ants on the Earth is equal to the total mass of all the people on Earth.

Did you know this????

Of all insects in the world, the ant has the largest brain. (This also explains why huge NYC waterbugs are so DUMB.) Below right is a picture of an ant brain. (How did they GET this??)Ant Brain

In fact, the processing power of an ant’s brain and a Macintosh II computer might just be pretty similar!

Ant RaftFor example, during a flood, rafts of fire ants can float to the shore on the flood waters. The rafts are made entirely of ants. The individual ants on the bottom die, but the colony survives. And if that’s not smart enough, then there’s the strain of ants that forms into a ball and rolls across the river. Since they keep rolling, nobody dies. Wow! We should take lessons from these little buggers.

An ant brain has about 250,000 brain cells. A human brain has 10,000 million. So a colony of just 40,000 ants has, collectively, the same size brain as a human.

Ant FaceAnts have large, super-strong jaws that open and shut sideways, LIKE SCISSORS. (I just threw that in because it’s weird.)ant scissors

They can’t swallow solid food, so after they scissor (?) out all the juice from pieces of food, they leave all the dry stuff behind. In your house.

I AM going somewhere with this:

When a few ants are placed in a sandpile, they wander around aimlessly, and seem totally oblivious to everything.

BUT HERE’S THE IMPORTANT PART.

Ant BrainIf you keep adding more ants, at a certain critical point they spontaneously start organizing into a working colony. And then they each automatically take on a specific job in the larger structure. How do they already know exactly what to do????

A different kind of awareness seems to be ignited when they’re surrounded by others like them, and they begin to act interconnected.

At a certain point, the ants become a brain.

And now on to human heart cells:

If totally random, individual heart cells are placed in a Petri dish, each cell contracts with its own specific rhythm.

But if you keep adding heart cells, when a critical number of cells is reached, they all start beating together and acting like a normal heart.Heart Cells

At a certain point, the cells become a heart.

There seems to be a collective consciousness that takes over, with ants and with heart cells, and even though each part has its own particular role, they also each somehow contain an awareness of the whole structure, and begin to function as one entity.

That is, EVERY PART CONTAINS THE WHOLE.

And that’s the definition of a hologram.

Over our human history, we have developed a powerful block against our awareness of the whole of which we are each a part. But, like ants and heart cells, we each contain the whole of something much greater.

Spiral GalaxyWe are each a hologram of the entire universe.

Our thoughts are the universe’s thoughts.

What power that gives us!

Once, it must have served us not to know it, and to shelve that awareness away, but it definitely doesn’t serve us any more.

We all get glimmers of it once in a while, and deeper parts of us know it’s true, but that information is largely hidden from us in our day-to-day reality.

We don’t let ourselves know what we know.

And that has brought us to where we are today.

But science, specifically quantum physics, is now presenting us with PROOF (which appeals to our logical, analytic left brain) that there is another level of reality in whichshocked woman everything is connected, anything can happen, and unlimited creativity rules.

Our left brains can’t talk us out of this one!

Ants and heart cells already know it.

Salvador Dali's Galatea

Salvador Dali's Galatea used with permission

Individually and collectively, as part of a whole, global, universal brain, we won’t be able to not know what we already know for very much longer.

This is a great time to be alive and aware, and become a part of this colossal transformation.

And just because ants scissor their food doesn’t mean they don’t have a brain in their heads.

Get Ignited!

Christine Ranck is the author of Ignite The Genius Within
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3 Comments

  1. Paul S. Markle

    Excellent example of how a system adapts and is greater than the sum of its parts…hard to get many people to look at things this way, but well written and to the point!

  2. What a delightful and revealing article. I have a colony of pet ants that live under my driveway that I study as they go about their daily efforts of surviving. I recently had my driveway covered with crushed cement. My wife was aghast when she realized that in doing so we covered up our pets. Oh, woe is me. I assured her that they would survive but she mourned for three days until, as we got in the car to go to town (the nearby city, not make whoopie) I yelled, there’s an ant…Sure enough the little buggers had dug themselves our of their tomb and were once again an object of research for us as we swing on our front porch. They’re such cute little creatures that seem to be so happy to be a part of “The Whole”…I look forward to the revelation…JWSIII